ASP.NET编程(第三版,影印版)
ASP.NET编程(第三版,影印版)
Jesse Liberty, Dan Hurwitz
出版时间:2006年04月
页数:930
自从2001年发布以来,微软的Visual Studio和ASP.NET已成为创建基于Windows的Web应用程序和服务的最受欢迎的工具。成千上万的开发者已经利用这本权威书籍来掌握这些工具。现在,在这个完全修订和扩展的版本中,作者Jesse Liberty和Dan Hurwitz向你展示如何使用Visual Studio 2005、C# 2.0和ASP.NET 2.0来构建下一代Web应用程序。你很快就能够用比你所能想象的更少的时间及更少的代码来建立更安全和更交互的站点。
《ASP.NET编程》以对ASP.NET 2.0和Visual Studio 2005的全面概述开始,这样使你能尽可能快地入门。前几章深入讨论了控制、事件、ASP.NET Web页面的生命周期以及其他ASP.NET框架的基本概念。
本书还包括以下新的主题:
● 创建与Master page一致的外貌风格
● 使站点易于个性化
● 增加站点导航,包括站点地图和零碎的信息
● 使用新的成员资格和授权控制来实现基于窗体的安全
● 使用新的数据控制和ADO.NET 2.0来存取与绑定数据
● 简化应用程序的配置和部署
Jesse Liberty是畅销的《Programming C#》和其他很多Web及面向对象程序设计方面的著作的作者。作为Liberty Associates, Inc.总裁,他提供ASP.NET、C#、C++和相关主题的编程、咨询服务以及在线培训。
Dan Hurwitz是Sterling Solutions, Inc.总裁,他给广大的各类客户提供了近乎20年的编程和数据库开发服务。
  1. Preface
  2. 1. ASP.NET 2.0
  3. .NET Framework 2.0
  4. ASP.NET 2.0
  5. New Features
  6. Special Folders Make Integration Easier
  7. Security
  8. Personalization
  9. Master Pages
  10. Navigation
  11. Web Sites Without IIS
  12. Improved Controls
  13. New Controls
  14. Visual Studio 2005 (VS2005)
  15. Mobile Devices
  16. On to VS2005
  17. 2. Visual Studio 2005
  18. Start Page
  19. File System
  20. HTTP
  21. FTP
  22. Creating Your First Web Page
  23. Projects and Solutions
  24. Solutions
  25. Projects and Files
  26. Templates
  27. Project Names
  28. The Integrated Development Environment (IDE)
  29. Layout
  30. Building and Running
  31. Menus and Toolbars
  32. File Menu
  33. Edit Menu
  34. View Menu
  35. Refactor Menu
  36. Website Menu
  37. Project Menu
  38. Build Menu
  39. Debug Menu
  40. Data Menu
  41. Format Menu
  42. Tools Menu
  43. Window Menu
  44. Help Menu
  45. 3. Controls: Fundamental Concepts
  46. Events
  47. ASP.NET Events
  48. Event Arguments
  49. Application and Session Events
  50. Page and Control Events
  51. Postback Versus Non-Postback Events
  52. IsPostBack
  53. Events in Visual Studio 2005
  54. Multiple Controls to One Event Handler
  55. ASP.NET Server Controls
  56. ASP.NET and Browsers
  57. ASP.NET Server Control Class Hierarchy
  58. CSS Styles
  59. HTML Server Controls
  60. Client-Side Processing
  61. 4. Basic Controls
  62. The Basics
  63. Label Control
  64. TextBox Control
  65. HiddenField Control
  66. Button Controls
  67. HyperLink Control
  68. Selecting Values
  69. CheckBox Control
  70. RadioButton Control
  71. Selecting from a List
  72. ListItem Object
  73. CheckBoxList Control
  74. RadioButtonList Control
  75. DropDownList Control
  76. ListBox Control
  77. BulletedList Control
  78. Tables
  79. Table Rows
  80. Table Cells
  81. Cell Width
  82. Panel Control
  83. Images
  84. Image Control
  85. ImageMap Control
  86. 5. Advanced Controls
  87. MultiView and View Controls
  88. Wizard Control
  89. FileUpload Control
  90. AdRotator Control
  91. Advertisement File
  92. Using AdRotator
  93. Calendar
  94. Selecting Dates in the Calendar
  95. Controlling the Calendar’s Appearance
  96. Programming the Calendar Control
  97. 6. Web Site Fundamentals
  98. The Page
  99. Code-Behind
  100. Moving to Another Page
  101. HyperLink
  102. Server.Transfer
  103. Response.Redirect
  104. Cross-Page Posting
  105. State
  106. Session State
  107. View State
  108. State Bag
  109. Application State
  110. Lifecycle
  111. Directives
  112. Application Directive
  113. Assembly Directive
  114. Control Directive
  115. Implements Directive
  116. Import Directive
  117. Master Directive
  118. MasterType Directive
  119. OutputCache Directive
  120. Page Directive
  121. Reference Directive
  122. Register Directive
  123. 7. Tracing, Debugging, and Error Handling
  124. Creating the Sample Application
  125. Tracing
  126. Page-Level Tracing
  127. Inserting into the Trace Log
  128. Application-Level Tracing
  129. Trace Viewer
  130. Debugging
  131. The Debug Toolbar
  132. Breakpoints
  133. Stepping Through Code
  134. Examining Variables and Objects
  135. Debug Windows
  136. Error Handling
  137. Unhandled Errors
  138. Application-Wide Error Pages
  139. Page-Specific Error Pages
  140. 8. Validation
  141. The RequiredFieldValidator
  142. The Summary Control
  143. The Compare Validator
  144. Checking the Input Type
  145. Comparing to Another Control
  146. Range Checking
  147. Regular Expressions
  148. Custom Validation
  149. Validation Groups
  150. 9. Web Data Access
  151. Getting Data from a Database
  152. Data Source Controls
  153. GridView Control
  154. Adding Insert, Update, and Delete Statements
  155. Multiuser Updates
  156. Optimistic Concurrency
  157. Displaying and Updating the Grid
  158. Take It for a Spin
  159. Tracking the Update with Events
  160. Modifying the Grid Based on Events
  161. Passing Parameters to the Select Query
  162. DataList Control
  163. Editing Items in List Controls
  164. Deleting Items from a List Control
  165. Repeater Control
  166. DetailsView Control: Examining One Record at a Time
  167. FormView Control: Examining Single Records as Master/Detail
  168. Editing with FormView
  169. Inserting New Records
  170. DetailsView and FormView Events
  171. 10. ADO.NET
  172. The ADO.NET Object Model
  173. The DataSet Class
  174. DbCommand and DbConnection
  175. The DataAdapter Object
  176. The Data Reader Object
  177. Getting Started with ADO.NET
  178. Using a DataReader
  179. Creating Data Relations Within DataSets
  180. Creating Data Objects by Hand
  181. Bug Database Design
  182. Creating the DataTable by Hand
  183. Creating Primary Keys
  184. Creating Foreign Keys
  185. Creating Data Relations
  186. Stored Procedures
  187. Creating a Simple Stored Procedure
  188. Stored Procedures with Parameters
  189. Updating with SQL and ADO.NET
  190. Updating Data with Transactions
  191. The ACID Test
  192. Implementing Transactions
  193. Binding to Business Objects
  194. 11. Forms-Based Security
  195. Authentication
  196. Anonymous Access
  197. Windows Authentication
  198. Passport Authentication
  199. Forms Authentication
  200. Forms-Based Authentication in Detail
  201. Create the Application
  202. Adding a Password Reminder
  203. Add Roles to ASP.NET Accounts
  204. Using the Web Administrator Tool to Set Up Roles
  205. Restricting Access to Pages Based on Roles
  206. 12. Master Pages and Navigation
  207. Master Pages
  208. Adding Content Pages
  209. Using Nested Master Pages
  210. Dynamically Editing the Master
  211. Navigation
  212. Getting Started with Site Navigation
  213. Setting Up the Pages
  214. Customizing the Look and Feel
  215. Populating on Demand
  216. Using a Menu for Navigation
  217. Enumerate Site Map Nodes Programatically
  218. Filtering Based on Security
  219. Enable Membership
  220. Adding Roles
  221. Add a Login Page
  222. Create Access Rules
  223. Creating a Permission-Driven Site Map
  224. 13. Personalization
  225. Creating Personalized Web Sites
  226. Recording Personalization Information
  227. Setting Up Profile Handling
  228. Exploring the Profile Tables
  229. Personalizing with Complex Types
  230. Anonymous Personalization
  231. Themes and Skins
  232. Create the Test Site
  233. Organize Site Themes and Skins
  234. Enable Themes and Skins
  235. Specify Themes for Your Page
  236. Setting Stylesheet Themes
  237. Setting Customization Themes
  238. Using Named Skins
  239. Web Parts
  240. Web Parts Architecture
  241. Creating Zones
  242. Adding Controls to Zones
  243. Minimizing and Restoring
  244. Enabling Editing and Layout Changes
  245. Creating a User Control to Enable Changing Page Layout
  246. Adding Parts from a Catalog
  247. 14. Custom and User Controls
  248. User Controls
  249. User Controls with Code
  250. @Control Directive
  251. Properties
  252. Handling Events
  253. Custom Controls
  254. Properties
  255. The Render Method
  256. Updating the Control
  257. Maintaining State
  258. Creating Derived Controls
  259. Creating Composite Controls
  260. 15. Creating Web Services
  261. How Web Services Work
  262. Developing a Web Service
  263. The Proxy
  264. Creating the Consumer
  265. Protocols and Standards
  266. HTTP
  267. XML
  268. SOAP
  269. Web Services Enhancements (WSE)
  270. Creating a Simple Web Service
  271. In-Line with a Text Editor
  272. Code-Behind with Visual Studio 2005
  273. WebService Directive
  274. Deriving from the WebService Class
  275. Application State via HttpContext
  276. WebServiceBinding Attribute
  277. WebMethod Attribute
  278. The BufferResponse Property
  279. CacheDuration Property
  280. Description Property
  281. EnableSession Property
  282. MessageName Property
  283. TransactionOption Property
  284. WebService Attribute
  285. Description Property
  286. Name Property
  287. Namespace Property
  288. Data Types
  289. Arrays
  290. Classes and Structs
  291. DataSets
  292. StockTickerComplete
  293. Creating Discovery Documents
  294. Discovery via Query String
  295. Static Discovery Files
  296. Deployment
  297. Pre-Compiled Assemblies
  298. Dynamically Compiled Assemblies
  299. 16. Consuming Web Services
  300. Discovery
  301. Creating the Client with VS2005
  302. Creating the Client Manually
  303. Creating the Consumer Web Page Content
  304. Creating the Proxy
  305. Compiling the Proxy Class
  306. Finishing the Consumer App
  307. Using Asynchronous Method Calls
  308. 17. Caching and Performance
  309. Types of Caching
  310. Class Caching
  311. Configuration Caching
  312. Data Caching
  313. Output Caching
  314. Object Caching
  315. Data Caching
  316. DataSourceControl Caching
  317. SQL Cache Dependency
  318. Output Caching
  319. The OutputCache Directive
  320. Fragment Caching: Caching Part of a Page
  321. Object Caching
  322. Cache Class Functionality
  323. Dependencies
  324. Scavenging
  325. Callback Support
  326. The HttpCachePolicy Class
  327. Performance
  328. ASP.NET-Specific Issues
  329. General .NET Issues
  330. Database Issues
  331. Benchmarking and Profiling
  332. 18. Application Logic and Configuration
  333. Internet Information Server (IIS)
  334. IIS Versions
  335. Virtual Directories
  336. Understanding Web Applications
  337. Application-Wide Logic
  338. HttpApplication Object
  339. global.asax
  340. Global Members
  341. Configuring the Application
  342. Hierarchical Configuration
  343. Format
  344. Configuration Settings UI
  345. Web Site Administration Tool
  346. Other Configuration Settings
  347. Custom Configuration Sections
  348. 19. Deployment
  349. Assemblies
  350. Microsoft Intermediate Language (MSIL)
  351. ILDASM
  352. Manifests
  353. Versioning
  354. Private Versus Shared Assemblies
  355. Strong Names
  356. Local Deployment
  357. Full Runtime Compilation
  358. Manual Compilation of Assemblies
  359. Full Pre-Compilation
  360. Pre-Compilation of Code Only
  361. Global Deployment
  362. Windows Installer
  363. Build Configurations
  364. Adding a Setup Project with the Setup Wizard
  365. Adding a Setup Project Manually
  366. Further Customizations
  367. Deploying the Web Site
  368. A. Keyboard Shortcuts
  369. B. Relational Database Technology: A Crash Course
  370. Index
书名:ASP.NET编程(第三版,影印版)
国内出版社:东南大学出版社
出版时间:2006年04月
页数:930
书号:7-5641-0321-3
原版书出版商:O'Reilly Media
Jesse Liberty
 
Jesse Liberty,现在是微软公司Silverlight开发团队的一名高级项目经理,他是《Programming .NET 3.5》、《Learning ASP.NET with AJAX》(都是O'Reilly出版社出版的)以及许多其他书的作者。他是一位著名的.NET专家,他具有在PBS担任软件架构师的经验,以及在AT&T担任优秀软件工程师的经验。你可以通过http://www.JesseLiberty.com与他取得联系。


Jesse Liberty是多部著作的作者,包括O'Reilly出版的Programming ASP.NET。Jesse 是Liberty Associates公司的总裁(http://WWW.LibertyAssociates.com)。这个公司提供.NET的培训、合同式编程服务,以及咨询。他曾是花旗银行电子发行部的副总裁,以及曾是AT&T、Ziff Davis、 Xerox 和PBS的杰出软件工程师(Distinguished Software Engineer)。

Jesse Liberty是许多计算机图书的作者,主题涉及面向对象编程、C++和Web编程。除本书外,还有O'Reilly即将出版的《Programming ASP.NET》。他是Liberty Associates公司(www.LibertyAssociates.com)的总裁,这个公司主要提供.NET技术培训、编程和咨询。他原来是花旗银行(Citibank)电子支付部门的副总裁。还曾经在AT&T、Ziff Davis、施乐和PBS公司担任过杰出软件工程师和架构师。
Jesse Liberty是Microsoft的Silverlight Development分部的高级项目经理。他的业务卡上的名字是“Silverlight Geek”(Silverlight奇客),并且他主要负责通过Silverlight.net培育Silverlight Developer社区。
Jesse是许多图书的作者,包括O’Reilly的Programming Silverlight 2和长期的畅销书Programming C# 3.0。Jesse具有20年的开发人员、作者和顾问的经历,并且是AT&T的著名软件工程师、PBS/Learning Link的软件架构师,以及Citibank的副总裁。他对自己编写的图书提供了全面的支持,可以访问他的博客,地址是:http://www.JesseLiberty.com。
Jesse Liberty, Microsoft .NET MVP, is the best-selling author of O'Reilly Media's Programming ASP.NET, Programming C#, Programming Visual Basic 2005, and over a dozen other books on web and object-oriented programming. He is president of Liberty Associates, Inc., where he provides contract programming, consulting, and on-site training in .NET.
Jesse is a frequent contributor to O'Reilly Networkweb sites, as well as many industry publications, and he has spoken at numerous events. He is a former Distinguished Software Engineer at AT&T, and Vice President for technology development at CitiBank.


Jesse Liberty is the best-selling author of O'Reilly's Learning ASP.NET with AJAX,
Programming C#, Programming .NET 3.5,and a dozen other books on programming.
He is a senior program manager at Microsoft on the Silverlight Development
Team, and a frequent contributor to O'Reilly Network web sites and publications.
Jesse is a former distinguished software engineer at AT&T and vice president for
technology development at CitiBank, and was an independent consultant for 12 years.
 
 
Dan Hurwitz
 
Dan Hurwitz是Sterling Solutions, Inc.的总裁,在该公司工作的近二十年中,他已经为许多客户提供了编程和数据库开发的服务。
Dan Hurwitz is the president of Sterling Solutions, Inc., where for nearly two
decades he has been providing contract programming and database development to a
wide variety of clients.
Dan Hurwitz is the president of Sterling Solutions, Inc., where for nearly two
decades he has been providing contract programming and database development to a
wide variety of clients. He has coauthored three editions of Programming ASP.NET.


Dan Hurwitz is the president of Sterling Solutions, Inc., where for more than two
decades he has been providing contract programming and database development to a
wide variety of clients.
 
 
The animal on the cover of Programming ASP.NET, Third Edition is a stingray. The
stingray is a cartilaginous fish, distinguished from other types of rays by the sawedged,
venomous spines that adorn its whip-like tail. Stingrays have flat, disk-shaped
bodies without distinct heads. They have well-developed pectoral fins, which undulate
to propel their bodies through the water. Stingrays’ eyes are on the top sides of
their bodies, while their mouths are on their undersides. Because of this, they cannot
see what they are eating and sometimes leave “hickeys” on scuba divers.
Stingrays live in shallow bays, sounds, and in-shore waters with sandy bottoms. They
usually keep to the ocean floor and will flatten themselves against the ground to hide
from predators. Despite their venomous tail spines, stingrays are not aggressive and
will flee from danger whenever possible. They feed on mollusks, crustaceans, and
some types of small fish. Sharks often prey on them, even though the two are closely
related.